Show Services

Water Damage

Mould Remediation

Fire Damage

Clean Up

Commercial Restoration

Why and when is asbestos a health hazard?

Frequently Asked Questions

    Request a Quote

    Asbestos is a hazardous substance that should be avoided at all costs. People who are exposed to asbestos, on the other hand, are not always concerned about their health. Disease risk is influenced by a variety of factors, including:

    • How much asbestos is in the air
    • How often do you get exposed, and for how long?
    • When did you initially become aware of the situation?
    • Whether or not the client has any current lung or breathing issues, as well as
    • Whether or not the person smokes cigarettes

    Asbestos-Related Diseases

    Breathing asbestos can cause microscopic asbestos fibers to become lodged in the lungs, irritating lung tissue.

    According to scientific studies, inhalation asbestos can cause the following non-cancerous diseases:

    • Asbestosis is scarring in the lungs caused by breathing asbestos fibers. Because oxygen and carbon dioxide cannot easily move into and out of damaged lungs, breathing becomes difficult. Asbestosis commonly develops in persons who have been exposed to high levels of asbestos for a long time, but symptoms may not present for years.
    • Pleural disease is a non-cancerous lung ailment in which the membrane that surrounds the lungs and chest cavity changes (pleura). Fluid may build up around the lungs, or the membrane may thicken overall (diffuse pleural thickening) or in isolated spots (pleural plaques) (known as a pleural effusion). Some people with pleural changes may have less efficient lung function, although not everyone with pleural changes will have breathing problems.

    Asbestos exposure also raises the risk of several cancers, including:

    • Lung cancer is malignant cancer that invades and clogs the airways of the lungs. When tobacco use is paired with asbestos exposure, the risk of lung cancer rises.
    • Mesothelioma is rare cancer that affects the pleura (the membrane that protects the lungs and chest cavity), the peritoneum (the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity), and the membranes that enclose other internal organs. Mesothelioma symptoms may not develop for 30 to 40 years after asbestos exposure.

    In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, asbestos exposure can induce malignancies of the larynx and ovary. Asbestos exposure has also been linked to cancers of the throat, stomach, and colorectum, according to recent research.

    Advice for people concerned about asbestos exposure 

    People who are concerned about asbestos exposure should get medical advice from their doctor or another medical professional. The doctor will determine whether more testing is required based on the person’s comprehensive exposure and medical history, as well as a physical examination.

    After exposure to asbestos, it is impossible to remove it from the lungs. Preventing future damage to the respiratory system can reduce the likelihood of disease developing or decrease the progression of a disease that has already developed. Asbestos exposure prevention guidelines include the following:

    • Having regular medical exams
    • Vaccinating against the flu and pneumococcal pneumonia on a regular basis
    • Quitting smoking
    • Avoiding further asbestos exposure

    Asbestos is a hazardous substance that should be avoided at all costs. People who are exposed to asbestos, on the other hand, are not always concerned about their health. Disease risk is influenced by a variety of factors, including:

    • How much asbestos is in the air
    • How often do you get exposed, and for how long?
    • When did you initially become aware of the situation?
    • Whether or not the client has any current lung or breathing issues, as well as
    • Whether or not the person smokes cigarettes

    Asbestos-Related Diseases

    Breathing asbestos can cause microscopic asbestos fibers to become lodged in the lungs, irritating lung tissue.

    According to scientific studies, inhalation asbestos can cause the following non-cancerous diseases:

    • Asbestosis is scarring in the lungs caused by breathing asbestos fibers. Because oxygen and carbon dioxide cannot easily move into and out of damaged lungs, breathing becomes difficult. Asbestosis commonly develops in persons who have been exposed to high levels of asbestos for a long time, but symptoms may not present for years.
    • Pleural disease is a non-cancerous lung ailment in which the membrane that surrounds the lungs and chest cavity changes (pleura). Fluid may build up around the lungs, or the membrane may thicken overall (diffuse pleural thickening) or in isolated spots (pleural plaques) (known as a pleural effusion). Some people with pleural changes may have less efficient lung function, although not everyone with pleural changes will have breathing problems.

    Asbestos exposure also raises the risk of several cancers, including:

    • Lung cancer is malignant cancer that invades and clogs the airways of the lungs. When tobacco use is paired with asbestos exposure, the risk of lung cancer rises.
    • Mesothelioma is rare cancer that affects the pleura (the membrane that protects the lungs and chest cavity), the peritoneum (the membrane that lines the abdominal cavity), and the membranes that enclose other internal organs. Mesothelioma symptoms may not develop for 30 to 40 years after asbestos exposure.

    In addition to lung cancer and mesothelioma, asbestos exposure can induce malignancies of the larynx and ovary. Asbestos exposure has also been linked to cancers of the throat, stomach, and colorectum, according to recent research.

    Advice for people concerned about asbestos exposure 

    People who are concerned about asbestos exposure should get medical advice from their doctor or another medical professional. The doctor will determine whether more testing is required based on the person’s comprehensive exposure and medical history, as well as a physical examination.

    After exposure to asbestos, it is impossible to remove it from the lungs. Preventing future damage to the respiratory system can reduce the likelihood of disease developing or decrease the progression of a disease that has already developed. Asbestos exposure prevention guidelines include the following:

    • Having regular medical exams
    • Vaccinating against the flu and pneumococcal pneumonia on a regular basis
    • Quitting smoking
    • Avoiding further asbestos exposure

    If you need assistance in asbestos removal & restoration, feel free to call us at (416) 551-8287.